New Books in Egyptology (May-June 2019)

Every two months the Nile Scribes update our readers on the most recent Egyptological publications. From popular reads to peer-reviewed scholarship, we hope to illustrate the wide variety of topics discussed in Egyptology, and perhaps introduce you to your next read! Below are 13 books scheduled for release this summer (May and June). Did you read our…

A Mummy Portrait Returns to the Royal Ontario Museum

Excavations during the late nineteenth century in Egypt’s Fayum revealed a large number of mummy portraits dating to Roman times. The portraits display the faces of many inhabitants of Roman Egypt in a naturalised fashion and these quickly became popular around the world. Recently, the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Toronto reacquired a mummy portrait…

A Reader’s Guide to Roman Egypt

March 15th, known as the Ides of March on the Roman calendar, marks the notorious day when Julius Caesar was stabbed to death in Rome in 44 BC. This week, the Nile Scribes highlight Egypt under Roman rule, a period often glossed over in surveys of ancient Egypt, which began when Marc Antony and Cleopatra were defeated…

The Latest Discoveries in Egyptology (May-June 2018)

Every few months, the Nile Scribes bring you summaries of the latest news and discoveries in Egyptology, both from the field and the lab. We’ll introduce you to the newest archaeological finds or recently undusted manuscripts being rediscovered in museum collections, plus other new theories stirring in the Egyptological Zeitgeist. In this edition, Graeco-Roman buildings…

Lecture: “Wet and Wild: the Nilotic Mosaic at Praeneste”

This past Wednesday, Steven Shubert gave an intriguing talk on Egyptianising elements in the famous second century BC Nilotic Mosaic at a lecture event hosted by the Toronto Chapter of the SSEA. Speakers for their summer programme this year have explored sites not as well-known outside of academic circles. The final talk of this series took the audience across the Mediterranean to the Italian site of Palestrina (ancient Praeneste).